Notes for Writers of Historical Twentieth Century Fiction

Notes for Writers of Historical Twentieth Century Fiction

writers-life

1.2 Social Interaction

Greetings: during the twentieth century people greeted each other with handshakes, hugs, upper arm grabbing and kissing on various facial parts, including the lips. (Huge potential for disease transference and death of minor characters.)

Alcohol: could be consumed in restaurants, pubs, parks and other public spaces. This could lead to carousing, sentimentality, revealing of vital plot secrets, dancing on tables and break up of superfluous relationships  in which the writer has lost interest.

Relationships: the following were possible precursors to marriage – hand holding, dinner dates, getting carried away during the polka, long lingering looks, sexual congress and actual countryside walks.

Miranda Lewis 2020

Day 3 of London lockdown and I’m reading, writing, gardening – what’s not to love? All very ordinary; all very strange.

Greetings Friday Fiction buddies around the world (no kisses of course, except virtual ones) and many thanks to Rochelle to whom I raise a glass of red – or I will later since it’s still early afternoon here and standards must be maintained. (photo copyright Jeff Arnold)

Stay well my friends. x

(For previous nonsense writers’ handbook entries click here.)

39 thoughts on “Notes for Writers of Historical Twentieth Century Fiction

  1. I have realised during all this that I do not actually make contact with many people in my day to day life, so am not missing it much! I am also still required to go to work, and have always enjoyed going for a run on my own, plus reading and writing in the house. Apart from missing the cinema, not much has changed so far! Stay safe, and a good fun story 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m similar – I lead quite a quiet life with my family, but I do love the cinema and the last time I was up in London, taking the train, was with thousands of people on a demo…I also volunteer on a veg farm once a week which is very sociable with lots of good chat out in the fields and a noisy communal lunch. This week my day there will be very different. Keep well!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Dear Miranda,

    I shall raise my glass of red to you as well. We are day 2 of lockdown here in Missouri. Not a lot has changed for me aside from my swimming which I dearly miss. Sweet story. Hopefully we’ll be able to return to those sociable behaviours soon.

    Shalom and good health,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Day 3 of London lockdown and I’m reading, writing, gardening – what’s not to love? All very ordinary; all very strange. – This is how I feel. Feels surreal. I’m largely a home body but that’s a choice. Now the choice isn’t mine I itch to go out (although I prefer to write, read, potter around the house).

    Great style used for the story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ordinary life with a huge dose of the worrying and distracting extraordinary… I managed to get out on Friday to a farm where I volunteer. (Essential work as it produces food and all set up for safe social distancing.) It felt good to get out and be totally adsorbed in a practical task.
      Stay well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • We haven’t heard so much about Australia over here but I think that’s because the news is relatively good. Not that after the fires then this anything is ‘good’… You too Susan – be well.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I enjoyed reading this… The phone has replaced my daily coffee outings. Opening up new opportunities to interact. Sadly some will be struggling to adapt.

    Liked by 1 person

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